Loading Events

Birmingham & the A-bomb

Wednesday 8 April 2020 / 5.30pm — 7.00pm

Tickets

The numbers below include tickets for this event already in your cart. Clicking "Get Tickets" will allow you to edit any existing attendee information as well as change ticket quantities.
Birmingham & the A-bomb
£ 3.00
14 available

This event has been postponed until further notice, we apologise for any disappointment.

Launch: 5.30–6pm
Talk: 6–7pm 

Join us to launch Yhonnie Scarce’s new installation at Ikon. This event connects the landscapes of Birmingham, where scientific calculations that led to the development of the atom bomb were made during World War II, and Maralinga, South Australia, where nuclear testing took place during 1956–63. Speakers include Dr Ele Carpenter, Reader in Curating at Goldsmiths University of London, and Dr Christopher Hill, Lecturer in History at University of South Wales.

Dr Ele Carpenter is a curator, writer and artist whose research considers the contemporary aesthetics of living in a nuclear present. Her curatorial research investigates nuclear aesthetics, ethics and decolonisation through commissioning new artwork, publishing, curating exhibitions, site visits and roundtable discussions in partnership with arts organisations and nuclear agencies. Ele Carpenter is convenor of the Nuclear Culture Research Group at Goldsmiths University of London where she is a Reader in Curating. She is an Associate Curator with Arts Catalyst, and a Visiting Research Fellow, Institute of the Arts, University of Cumbria. Recent curated exhibitions and roundtable discussions include: ‘Perpetual Uncertainty’ Malmö Konstmuseum, Sweden (2018), Z33 House of Contemporary Art, Hasselt, Belgium (2017), Bildmuseet, Umeå University, Sweden (2016 – 2017). Ele is editor of The Nuclear Culture Source Book (2016). She is currently working on a new project for the CAC Vilnuis, opening in September 2020.

In his first book, Peace and Power in Cold War Britain, Dr Christopher Hill examines the relationship between anti-nuclear activism and the media. He is currently working on his next book, The Nuclear Imperialists: British Power at the End of Empire. This explores how imperial norms about the environment, international politics and race shaped the British nuclear programme, from the places where uranium was mined and weapons were tested to the people who were endangered as part of this process.

Booking essential – please book online or call Ikon on 0121 248 0711. Online booking closes at 5pm on Wednesday 8 April 2020.

Presented as part of the Arts and Science Festival, University of Birmingham.